Lean R&D

The Trouble with Dedicated Resources: Leveling the Workload

Published by Adrian Fegan in Lean R&D on January 17, 2019

Dedication of resources may seem like a good way to have “Subject Matter Experts” (SMEs) get through work quickly, but it gives rise to a costly productivity penalty. The antidote is to level the workload across the team (without compromising the important role of the SME!).

Lab Testing - The Prioritization Problem

Published by Adrian Fegan in Lean Laboratory, Lean R&D on September 4, 2018

Lab testing schedules are often dominated by complex prioritization strategies but there is a less stressful way to successfully deal with samples.

The Paradox of Data in R&D Labs

Published by Adrian Fegan in Lean R&D on June 5, 2018

R&D labs are in the business of generating, analyzing, reviewing and validating data. Data rules the decisions on how projects move forward through the development phases.

Applying Lean in Pharmaceutical R&D Labs

Published by Tom Reynolds in Lean R&D on April 11, 2018

Over the past few years, many of the leading Pharmaceutical companies have rolled out extensive programmes to the labs on their manufacturing sites.  The better programmes (i.e. those based on the key ‘Real Lean’ principles of levelling, flow and standard work and properly structured and supported) have achieved very impressive results. Pharmaceutical R&D labs however, are significantly different than the Product and Raw Material testing labs found in Pharmaceutical Manufacturing so can Real Lean work in R&D Labs?

Importance of including Lab Planners when designing Lean Lab solutions

Published by Cathal Boyce in Lean Laboratory, Lean R&D on May 30, 2014

When designing lab solutions, Analysts, Lab Managers, Supervisors and Approvers are all important stakeholders.  The solution will be designed so that these stakeholders can carry out their tasks as efficiently and obstruction-free as possible.  However, it shouldn’t be forgotten that the lab Planner is also a critical stakeholder, and planning of the workload, both for the lab as a whole and for individual analysts, is the first step to ensuring a levelled workload and flow through the lab.

Structured Problem Solving – the Missing Link in Labs

Published by Patrick Conneran in Lean Laboratory, Lean R&D on November 6, 2013

Structured Problem Solving has been one of the foundations of Lean transformation, and of almost any high performing company over the past 50 years. However, many labs reject Structured Problem Solving techniques outright, or use them as a ‘box – ticking’ exercise to satisfy management that they are adhering to the latest directive. Why is it, when successful organisations pride themselves on a culture of continuous improvement and problem-solving, that in Labs, it is often the missing link to true transformative improvements…?

Making Sense of the Chaos in Laboratories

Published by Preston Chandler in Lean Laboratory, Lean R&D on May 23, 2013

To an outsider (and often even the insiders) laboratories can seem like a workplace hovering on the brink of chaos. The lab is constantly bombarded with hot requests for this lot or a special test for that project.  Investigations, vacations, changes in product, adjustments in mix, FDA inspections, equipment issues and narrowly specialized analysts can often add to this sense of chaos.  Usually it is difficult to see how work flows in the lab, if in fact it does flow.  It can also be next to impossible to identify what is “normal” behavior.  One of the critical steps in creating a Lean Lab is separating the routine (or in some cases, the most routine) from the non-routine or non-predictable.

5S in labs; a waste of time, right?

Published by Karen Wrafter in Lean Laboratory, Lean R&D on August 31, 2011

Deployment of 5S in a laboratory setting is a time consuming effort and one which in itself delivers little in terms of productivity gains. So why bother…?

Lean Thinking for Laboratories

Published by Tom Reynolds in Lean Laboratory, Lean R&D on May 5, 2011

While it might sound like some sort of fad diet, “lean” in the context of business improvement refers to a specific methodology that originated in the Japanese motor industry toward the end of the 1980s. Over the decades, this lean philosophy has been successfully adopted by many companies across a broad spectrum of industries and, more recently, lean thinking has filtered into laboratories. The focus of a lean laboratory is to test samples in the most efficient way possible in terms of cost, or speed, or both. Although most of the key principles of lean apply in labs, the specific challenges facing laboratories require significant adaptation of standard lean tools.